SALLY

“Sally forth, my friends” –old saying

Sally only smokes in boats.
Sally gives up on wet afternoons.
Sally tries hard all winter.
Sally wants what bears want.
Sally goes slowly through stores.
Sally makes it her business to sit.
Sally has several foods for each sauce.
Sally rounds up pages of poems.
Sally takes a bus only if it’s snowing.
Sally only eats with company present.
Sally makes it seem she’s not in charge.
Sally is, after all, like other people, despite her opinions.
Sally watches TV to forget you.
Sally has a secret lovely singing voice.
Sally has a language she never uses.
Sally hates what the girls hate.
Sally secretly likes the same things she always liked.
Sally has nice ears, so what?

3 Comments

  1. January 24, 2014 at 2:09 pm

    Suzy Cleans Up

    Suzy tried to fix her vacuum,
    found a bag for empty cans,
    drained the sink and washed the dishes,
    wiped the pot and both the pans.
    That was it for pressing details.
    That was it for weekend plans.

    Suzy rented Reefer Madness,
    thinking it was Jacques Cousteau.
    Now she’s lying on the sofa
    —feeling quite adagio—
    flipping through a Car and Driver,
    slurping down a sloppy joe.

    Louie’s Lonesome Diner beckons—
    Suzy’s taking Lisa’s shift.
    Lisa’s getting married Sunday.
    Suzy needs a card and gift.
    Wear the mini—Suzy’s getting
    off at two, she’ll need a lift.

    Harry’s nuts for almond cookies.
    Suzy buys him chocolate chip.
    Harry has to work on weekend.
    Suzy phones the dealership.
    Harry’s always with a client.
    Harry says they’ll take a trip.

    Suzy wants her own small business.
    Suzy wants her own backyard.
    Suzy wants her own Jacuzzi.
    Suzy needs a gift and card.
    She’ll become the Lonesome’s owner,
    queen of Northern Boulevard.

    Lisa’s theme is Hearts and Cupid.
    Lisa’s dress is long and nice.
    Suzy thinks the whole thing’s stupid.
    Suzy said she’ll bring the rice.
    Suzy wouldn’t marry Harry.
    Maybe if he asked her twice.

    Maggie Robbins

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/B001G8WDXM/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_S_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=2UBT26T6UAAU3&coliid=I3SJ8MP4H4AOGM

  2. drew said,

    January 25, 2014 at 5:11 pm

    OF all the girls that are so smart
    There’s none like pretty Sally;
    She is the darling of my heart,
    And she lives in our alley.
    There is no lady in the land 5
    Is half so sweet as Sally;
    She is the darling of my heart,
    And she lives in our alley.

    Her father he makes cabbage-nets
    And through the streets does cry ’em; 10
    Her mother she sells laces long
    To such as please to buy ’em:
    But sure such folks could ne’er beget
    So sweet a girl as Sally!
    She is the darling of my heart, 15
    And she lives in our alley.

    When she is by, I leave my work,
    I love her so sincerely;
    My master comes like any Turk,
    And bangs me most severely— 20
    But let him bang his bellyfull,
    I’ll bear it all for Sally;
    She is the darling of my heart,
    And she lives in our alley.

    Of all the days that’s in the week 25
    I dearly love but one day—
    And that’s the day that comes betwixt
    A Saturday and Monday;
    For then I’m drest all in my best
    To walk abroad with Sally; 30
    She is the darling of my heart,
    And she lives in our alley.

    My master carries me to church,
    And often am I blamed
    Because I leave him in the lurch 35
    As soon as text is named;
    I leave the church in sermon-time
    And slink away to Sally;
    She is the darling of my heart,
    And she lives in our alley. 40

    When Christmas comes about again
    O then I shall have money;
    I’ll hoard it up, and box it all,
    I’ll give it to my honey;
    I would it were ten thousand pound, 45
    I’d give it all to Sally;
    She is the darling of my heart,
    And she lives in our alley.

    My master and the neighbours all
    Make game of me and Sally, 50
    And, but for her, I’d better be
    A slave and row a galley;
    But when my seven long years are out
    O then I’ll marry Sally,—
    O then we’ll wed, and then we’ll bed, 55
    But not in our alley!

    Sally in our Alley by Henry Carey (d. 1743)

  3. drew said,

    January 25, 2014 at 5:17 pm


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