SCARRIET’S NEW HOT 1OO!!

1. John Ashbery –Still the most respected living U.S. poet
2. Billy Collins    –Still the most entertaining living U.S. poet
3. Kenneth Goldsmith  –Does the avant-garde still exist?
4. Stephen Burt  –Is Criticism respected anymore?
5. Marjorie Perloff   –Has avant-garde criticism any controversies left?
6. Helen Vendler  –the 21st century Pater
7. Harold Bloom  –the 21st century Emerson
8. Frank Bidart  –cooked until raw
9. Sharon Olds  –the honesty of woman
10. Robert Pinsky  –the 21st century Untermeyer
11. Paul Muldoon  –New Yorker poetry editor
12. David Lehman –Best American Poetry editor
13. Don Share  –Poetry magazine editor
14. Al Filreis  –Video Education Guru
15. Garrison Keillor  –Folksy Poetry Lives!
16. William Logan  –Knife Wielding Critic
17. Anne Carson –Brainy School
18. Ron Silliman –avant-fustian, necessary
19. Natasha Trethewey –Second term U.S. Poet Laureate
20. Kay Ryan –Cute School
21. Jorie Graham –Sky-Is-Falling School
22. Mary Oliver –21st century Wordsworth
23. Derek Walcott –21st century Southey
24. W.S. Merwin –21st century W.S. Merwin
25. Tony Hoagland –plain-talking hipster poetry
26. Philip Nikolayev —Fulcrum editor, Russian translation
27. Franz Wright –21st century John Clare
28. D.A. Powell –the quite good gay poet
29. Marilyn Chin –de Stael of Asian chick poetry
30. Charles Bernstein –Langwhich
31. David Orr –NYTimes Poetry reviewer
32. Rita Dove –anthologist who freaked out Vendler and Perloff
33. Erin Belieu –VIDA
34. Michael Robbins –“Where competency ends,” Ange Mlinko “begins”
35. Kevin  Young –Studied with Heaney
36. Ben Mazer  –Studied with Heaney
37. Ron Padget  –LA Times Book Prize
38. Lucie Brock-Broido –rococo
39. Louise Gluck –quiet confessionalism
40. Rosanna Warren  –Robert Penn Warren’s little girl
41. Christopher Ricks –professor at B.U.
42. Anis Shivani  –MFA smasher
43. Amy King –twist and shout
44. John Koethe –a philosopher poet
45. Carl Phillips  –teaches at the college founded by TS Eliot’s grandad.
46. Charles Simic –compares elegant checkmates in chess to elegant endings of poems…
47. Robert Bly –at Harvard with Rich, Koch, O’Hara, Hall, Ashbery…
48. Vanessa Place –avant-garde book of dollar bills
49. Dana Gioia –the essay that shamed us all…
50. Robert Hass –has a book, “20th century pleasures”
51. Simon Armitage –leading Brit
52. Frederick Seidel –controversial, 1962, first book prize
53. Cole Swensen –post-Language school
54. Matthew Dickman –works as a baker
55. James Tate –teaches at Amherst
56. Lyn Hejinian –“it is not imperfect to have died”
57. Eileen Myles –diary poetry
58. Geoffrey Hill –gnarled syntax
59. Paul Hoover –institutional ‘new’
60. Alfred Corn –Harold Bloom called him ‘visionary’
61. Rae Armantrout  –avant-garde, in brief
62. Terrance Hayes –began as a visual artist
63. Henri Cole –a Thom Gunn award winner
64. Seth Abramson –pro-MFA lawyer poet
65. Peter Gizzi –tenuous lyric
66. Mark McGurl —Program Era author
67. Janet Holmes –we can never remember how to spell Ahsahta…
68. George Bilgere –Billy Collins in waiting…
69. Matthew Zapruder –editor of Wave books
70. Ange Mlinko –see #34
71. Cate Marvin –VIDA, too
72. Maya Angelou –remember her?
73. Brenda Hillman –“Allow form.”
74. Galway Kinnell –why don’t these legends write tell-alls?
75. Dorothea Lasky –teaches at Columbia
76. Nikki Finney –“us giving us away”
77. Noah Eli Gordon –#34 called his work “simply dead.”
78. K. Silem Mohammed –was a featured writer for Blog Harriet
79. Ariana Reines –“I know that really beautiful women are never alone.”
80. Richard Wilbur –Old Man Rhyme
81. Rowan Ricardo Phillips —When Blackness Rhymes with Blackness
82. Garrick Davis –editor, Critical Flame
83. Alan Cordle –the foetry revolution!
84. J.D. McClatchy —Yale Review editor
85. Philip Levine –‘Whitman of the industrial heartland’
86. Clive James –from down under
87. Robert Archambeau –his blog is Samizdat
88. Matthea Harvey –skittery queen?
89. Laura Kasischke –“not only the hysterical giggling of girls, but the trembling of the elderly”
90. Paul Legault –The Emily Dickinson “translations.”
91. Lynn Xu –Waste Land’s child
92. Laura Jensen –Donald Justice-era Iowa Workshop grad
93. CA Conrad –pop-inflected Bukowski
94. Jynne Martin –“Draw any beast by starting with a circle!”
95. Traci Brimhall –believes in The Next Big Thing
96. Adam Fitzgerald —amour de soi
97. Cyrus Cassells –Lambda Literary award winner
98. Richard Siken –“no one will ever want to sleep with you
99. Naomi Shihab Nye  –fights terrorism & prejudice
100. U.S. Dhuga —Battersea, baby!

19 Comments

  1. powersjq said,

    April 17, 2014 at 4:01 pm

    #49. Just re-read it, and it still stings.

    http://www.danagioia.net/essays/ecpm.htm

    • thomasbrady said,

      April 18, 2014 at 12:38 pm

      Yes, it still does

  2. Drew said,

    April 18, 2014 at 4:21 am

    Never heard of any of them…
    are they worth reading?

    • thomasbrady said,

      April 18, 2014 at 12:39 pm

      Poetry: a small world. You’ll be on the list some day, Drew.

      In an ideal world, my list would link samples of their work, so you could be easily instructed…

      • Drew said,

        April 19, 2014 at 12:58 am

        I learn what I need to know from the great poetic souls at SCARRIET !

  3. noochness said,

    April 18, 2014 at 1:29 pm

    http://flavorwire.com/449473/50-essential-books-of-poetry-that-everyone-should-read/

    In the spirit of the Scarriet Top 100, here’s a list of “50 Essential Books of Poetry That Everyone Should Read”

    • thomasbrady said,

      April 18, 2014 at 8:14 pm

      Thanks, Nooch,

      An idea for Scarriet: 100 Most Important Poetry Books.

      The Flavorwire top 50 effort leaves much to be desired: 15% are from poets writing before 1900, the same amount, 15%, from living black lady poets. Now I love black lady poets, but this list covers the entire history of poetry since Ovid. It is missing so many good poets that the list is almost useless, though no list is completely useless.

  4. Drew said,

    April 19, 2014 at 8:06 pm

    Did Laura Van der B. mention fiction yet?
    That last post may get her on this thread…

  5. Drew said,

    April 19, 2014 at 8:13 pm

    Do you really like Maya A.?

    That type of poetry revulses me

    http://www.cosmoetica.com/TOP36-DES33.htm

    • thomasbrady said,

      April 20, 2014 at 3:04 pm

      Drew,

      The list is a zeitgeist list, not a ‘like’ list.

  6. anonymous said,

    April 20, 2014 at 2:47 am

    Tom: #42 should be ANIS Shivani. I think Avis rents cars or something.

    Drew: “Never heard of any of them…” Really? And you’re from what planet?

    • thomasbrady said,

      April 20, 2014 at 8:39 am

      Avis does try harder, but thanks.

      I think Drew is from this planet. Unfortunately, those who know poets today are from an unknown planet, or the MFA one. If 1 in 10,000 know Auden or Shelley or Suckling, how many are going to know Pinsky?

  7. Drew said,

    April 20, 2014 at 11:36 pm

    To be honest, I was playing dumb.
    I HAVE heard of Collins, Walcott, Keillor, Dove, Bly and Angelou.
    6 out of 100 – pretty poetic, no?

  8. anonymous said,

    April 21, 2014 at 12:34 am

    Drew, to be honest, a lot of these names are a mystery to me, too.

    powersjq, thanks for the Gioia link. I reread the whole thing again. I used to refer to it as the ‘Autopsy Report’. Things haven’t changed much after twenty years, have they? Well, I guess when you’re dead your dead.

    I don’t think it’s entirely the fault of Academia, though. The creation of the poetry subculture was probably just as much a reaction to the death of poetry culture in general in modern American society. I remember, even fifty years ago, that the mention of poetry brought blank stares. I guess Elvis and the Beatles trumped Pound and Poe.

  9. Drew said,

    June 6, 2014 at 10:47 pm

    Maya Angelou… yes – I HAVE heard of her !

    [Maya Angelou reads “On the Pulse of Morning” at Bill Clinton inaugural, January 20, 1993]

    Alas – the Muses wept at her recent passing:

    http://thepeoplescube.com/peoples-blog/maya-angelou-truly-the-barack-obama-of-poetry-t14052.html

    • thomasbrady said,

      June 7, 2014 at 9:35 pm

      Drew,

      Yes, #72 is no longer with us. And #86, I hear, is dying of cancer. His recent translation of Dante’s Commedia is now in stores.


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