TO SEE HER SUFFER

Image result for abstract painting woman in black dress

To see my love suffer

Is more pleasurable than when I loved her.

There is no greater pleasure

In love, than to see one who made you suffer, suffer,

For lovers always doubt, and love can be feigned,

As easily as lovers in books are named.

She loved me and then she changed her mind,

And intentional or not, I felt it as unkind,

And now when I see her, miserable and sad,

Love, that doubted, now makes me glad,

Because pleasure in love is what we share,

And the more the pleasure, the more the love was rare.

And we, that now, in suffering, remain,

Are proof we did not love in vain.

It proves there existed mutual feeling;

The love which gave love is the same love stealing

Love, the same love, the same care,

Whether she loved truly, or was aware

Of love, when she was with me here now that she is there.

 

12 Comments

  1. Anonymous said,

    September 29, 2017 at 11:17 pm

    Have you considered therapy?

    • Anonymous said,

      September 30, 2017 at 5:26 am

      Seriously.

    • Mr. Woo said,

      September 30, 2017 at 2:24 pm

      Have you considered a more meaningful existence?

      • Anonymous said,

        October 1, 2017 at 4:58 pm

        That would be somewhat difficult since existence has no meaning.

  2. thomasbrady said,

    September 30, 2017 at 3:15 pm

    Expressive art therapy?

  3. Anonymous said,

    September 30, 2017 at 4:42 pm

    Funny how someone who hates “modernist” poetry is such a confessional poet. Talk about Plath.

  4. thomasbrady said,

    September 30, 2017 at 6:02 pm

    It’s not a confessional poem. And the Modernists didn’t invent the confessional poem, anyway. That’s the real problem with Modernism. It thinks it’s new, when it’s not. “To See Her Suffer” is exploring an aspect of human nature in a lyrical manner. Shakespeare’s Sonnets are “confessional” in a like manner—the Sonnets are actually philosophical, and not the soap opera modern critics think they are: there is no “young man” story. Dante/Beatrice and Petrarch/Laura are shrouded in mystery, as well.

    • Anonymous said,

      September 30, 2017 at 6:27 pm

      Methinks thou dost protest too much.

      To acknowledge guilt is to embrace freedom.

      • thomasbrady said,

        September 30, 2017 at 9:15 pm

        I’ll “embrace freedom,” but where’s the “guilt?”

        • Anonymous said,

          September 30, 2017 at 11:17 pm

          We have it on good authority, Mr. Graves that you have been observed in possession of, and possibly even reading,.the collected works of Ezra Pound and possibly even Auden and Eliot as well.

          Please be advised that confirmation thereof may result in your expulsion from the Poe Society and possibly even the Secret Order of Ravens.

          • thomasbrady said,

            October 1, 2017 at 1:00 pm

            I belong to no Society. I read what I please. But I can tell a raven from a wheel barrow.


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